gaymanga: TCAF 2015 – Gengoroh Tagame Talks Gay Manga, “Bara,” BL...



gaymanga:

TCAF 2015 – Gengoroh Tagame Talks Gay Manga, “Bara,” BL and Scanlation

Deb Aoki at Manga Comics Manga has put together an excellent post based on the “Gay Comics Art Japan” panel from TCAF 2015, in which I participated alongside Gengoroh Tagame, Anne Ishii, and Leyla Aker. The conversation covers a wide assortment of subjects including the crossover between gay manga and BL, audience identity, creators’ privacy issues, Tagame’s qualms with “bara” and his evolving views on the term, as well as his interest in bringing gay symbols and culture to the forefront through My Brother’s Husband

One of my favorite threads in the discussion came from SuBLime’s Leyla Aker, as she mused on why labels and categorization are so important for fans across the spectrum of homoerotic manga:

[…] whether you’re a gay man reading gay comics or a straight woman reading BL comics or a gay man reading BL comics or a straight woman… what you’re doing is that you are looking for alternatives to the kind of homogeneous mass edifice of sexuality as depicted in mass media.

Clearly if you are a person who’s seeking out that kind of content, the mass media version is not doing it for you. Not only is the mass media version not catering to you– it is actively kind of trying to erase what your desires are. I think that most people tend to have an experience of that if they’re into this content. So I think it’s partially almost a reaction against that.

Because it’s such a crucial issue to a person’s identity, when you do find this kind of content that actually speaks to your desires and experience then it becomes very important to kind of get that identity right. So that’s what I think partially leads to a lot of this self-imposed kind of categorization.

Read the whole transcript at Manga Comics Manga!

TCAF 2015 – Gengoroh Tagame Talks Gay Manga, “Bara,” BL and...



TCAF 2015 – Gengoroh Tagame Talks Gay Manga, “Bara,” BL and Scanlation

Deb Aoki at Manga Comics Manga has put together an excellent post based on the “Gay Comics Art Japan” panel from TCAF 2015, in which I participated alongside Gengoroh Tagame, Anne Ishii, and Leyla Aker. The conversation covers a wide assortment of subjects including the crossover between gay manga and BL, audience identity, creators’ privacy issues, Tagame’s qualms with “bara” and his evolving views on the term, as well as his interest in bringing gay symbols and culture to the forefront through My Brother’s Husband

One of my favorite threads in the discussion came from SuBLime’s Leyla Aker, as she mused on why labels and categorization are so important for fans across the spectrum of homoerotic manga:

[…] whether you’re a gay man reading gay comics or a straight woman reading BL comics or a gay man reading BL comics or a straight woman… what you’re doing is that you are looking for alternatives to the kind of homogeneous mass edifice of sexuality as depicted in mass media.

Clearly if you are a person who’s seeking out that kind of content, the mass media version is not doing it for you. Not only is the mass media version not catering to you– it is actively kind of trying to erase what your desires are. I think that most people tend to have an experience of that if they’re into this content. So I think it’s partially almost a reaction against that.

Because it’s such a crucial issue to a person’s identity, when you do find this kind of content that actually speaks to your desires and experience then it becomes very important to kind of get that identity right. So that’s what I think partially leads to a lot of this self-imposed kind of categorization.

Read the whole transcript at Manga Comics Manga!

TCAF 2015 – Gengoroh Tagame Talks Gay Manga, “Bara,” BL and...



TCAF 2015 – Gengoroh Tagame Talks Gay Manga, “Bara,” BL and Scanlation

Deb Aoki at Manga Comics Manga has put together an excellent post based on the “Gay Comics Art Japan” panel from TCAF 2015, in which I participated alongside Gengoroh Tagame, Anne Ishii, and Leyla Aker. The conversation covers a wide assortment of subjects including the crossover between gay manga and BL, audience identity, creators’ privacy issues, Tagame’s qualms with “bara” and his evolving views on the term, as well as his interest in bringing gay symbols and culture to the forefront through My Brother’s Husband

One of my favorite threads in the discussion came from SuBLime’s Leyla Aker, as she mused on why labels and categorization are so important for fans across the spectrum of homoerotic manga:

[…] whether you’re a gay man reading gay comics or a straight woman reading BL comics or a gay man reading BL comics or a straight woman… what you’re doing is that you are looking for alternatives to the kind of homogeneous mass edifice of sexuality as depicted in mass media.

Clearly if you are a person who’s seeking out that kind of content, the mass media version is not doing it for you. Not only is the mass media version not catering to you– it is actively kind of trying to erase what your desires are. I think that most people tend to have an experience of that if they’re into this content. So I think it’s partially almost a reaction against that.

Because it’s such a crucial issue to a person’s identity, when you do find this kind of content that actually speaks to your desires and experience then it becomes very important to kind of get that identity right. So that’s what I think partially leads to a lot of this self-imposed kind of categorization.

Read the whole transcript at Manga Comics Manga!

Tokyo Recap: Otome Road Edition! After a visit to Big Gym in...

















Tokyo Recap: Otome Road Edition!

After a visit to Big Gym in Ikebukuro one day, Anne and I happened to stumble upon “Otome Road” (乙女ロード), an area dense with manga shops and cosplay stores aimed at young women. It’s been likened to a female Akihabara (though smaller in scale) and has also been called, indelicately, “Fujoshi Street." 

I was pleasantly surprised to discover endless shelves of BL doujinshi at the various manga shops we entered. The vast BL doujinshi world is ruled by parody, and at one shop, the entire archive was organized by the franchise being parodied. I took home some Lord of the Rings and Neon Genesis: Evangelion BL, but they had manga homoeroticizing everything from Naruto and Pokemon to Attack on Titan, Harry Potter, Transformers, and Pirates of the Caribbean

At Mandarake’s basement store on Otome Road, gems included Benedict Cumberbatch BL, boy band hug pillows, and VHS tapes of the failed early ‘90s live action Sailor Moon show. Nearby, a cosplay shop offered a variety of anime-hair wigs and a monolithic Sega arcade produced a dull roar of beeps and bloops.

Tokyo Recap: Otome Road Edition! After a visit to Big Gym in...

















Tokyo Recap: Otome Road Edition!

After a visit to Big Gym in Ikebukuro one day, Anne and I happened to stumble upon “Otome Road” (乙女ロード), an area dense with manga shops and cosplay stores aimed at young women. It’s been likened to a female Akihabara (though smaller in scale) and has also been called, indelicately, “Fujoshi Street." 

I was pleasantly surprised to discover endless shelves of BL doujinshi at the various manga shops we entered. The vast BL doujinshi world is ruled by parody, and at one shop, the entire archive was organized by the franchise being parodied. I took home some Lord of the Rings and Neon Genesis: Evangelion BL, but they had manga homoeroticizing everything from Naruto and Pokemon to Attack on Titan, Harry Potter, Transformers, and Pirates of the Caribbean

At Mandarake’s basement store on Otome Road, gems included Benedict Cumberbatch BL, boy band hug pillows, and VHS tapes of the failed early ‘90s live action Sailor Moon show. Nearby, a cosplay shop offered a variety of anime-hair wigs and a monolithic Sega arcade produced a dull roar of beeps and bloops.