tagagen: Coloring. Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎) coloring a B&W cop...



tagagen:

Coloring.

Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎) coloring a B&W cop torture illustration formerly seen in the 2013 collaborative doujinshi Police Stories by Fabrissou, Kumada Masato, and Tagame.

tagagen: Coloring. Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎) coloring a B&W cop...



tagagen:

Coloring.

Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎) coloring a B&W cop torture illustration formerly seen in the 2013 collaborative doujinshi Police Stories by Fabrissou, Kumada Masato, and Tagame.

Fabrissou, the French comic artist behind Le Bara Ça N’Existe Pas...





Fabrissou, the French comic artist behind Le Bara Ça N’Existe Pas and Police Stories, has just announced the first publication of his great comic series Dokkun in English!

Volume 1 and Volume 2 of the best of Dokkun in English are available for pre-order on Fabrissou’s store

Bara ha Barabara Da (バラはバラバラだ), 2013Japanese-language edition of...











Bara ha Barabara Da (バラはバラバラだ), 2013
Japanese-language edition of Le Bara Ça N’Existe Pas 
by Fabrissou and Edo

This version of the great gay manga collection is the same as its French edition, but instead of Anfelo’s “Bara Logic” comic strips it includes a charming 40-page manga by Fabrissou called 君は俺の思い出のままだ (You Are What Remains of My Memories).

Le Bara Ça N'Existe Pas, 2014Anthology by Fabrissou and Edo...





















Le Bara Ça N'Existe Pas, 2014
Anthology by Fabrissou and Edo

Fabrissou generously sent me review copies of both the French and Japanese editions of his excellent anthology a while back, and I’ve been absurdly delinquent in putting a post together. Forgive me, Fabrissou! Finally I found time to photograph these wonderful books over the weekend. 

Le Bara Ça N'Existe Pas is a fabulous French-language introduction to contemporary gay manga, comprised of illustrations and interviews with 29 mangaka. The line-up includes many of our favorites– to name a few: Seizoh Ebisubashi, Gengoroh Tagame, Banjyaku, Go Fujimoto, Kazuhide Ichikawa, Kenta, Takeshi Matsu, Gai Mizuki, Moritake, Terujirou, Noda Gaku, Mura and SUV.

Each profile begins with a statement from the artist on his work, before going on to discuss their beginnings in manga, influences, and which of their own works are their favorites. Later in the book, questions posed to the artists about publishing and the manga-making process yield some fascinating responses. 

The French edition concludes with a glossary of Japanese words and a selection of strips from Venezuelan artist Anfelo’s hilarious comic “Bara Logic.” The Japanese edition of the book, titled Bara ha Barabara Da (バラはバラバラだwhich was released last fall, ends instead with a Japanese-language comic by Fabrissou. I’ll post photos of the Japanese version next!

Go check out Fabrissou’s store and while you’re there, check out the brand new 7th issue of his great comic series Dokkun!