Some sad news: after 21 years and 241 issues, G-men magazine will...



Some sad news: after 21 years and 241 issues, G-men magazine will be ceasing publication. The magazine’s publisher, Furukawa Shobou, will continue producing gay manga for digital distribution via e-books and a forthcoming smartphone app. The company’s DVD and book publishing business will also continue. 

G-men was launched by founding editors Gengoroh Tagame and Hiroshi Hasegawa, along with another editor from Badi magazine, in 1995. The early issues (#1-62) featured cover artwork by Tagame, during which time the artist was intimately involved in many aspects of the magazine’s production. The magazine’s impact in the 1990s cannot be understated: it helped establish a boldly masculine new aesthetic for the Japanese gay community, spoke openly about issues like HIV/AIDS, and had an outlook that was both global and proudly Japanese. 

Jiraiya’s hypermasculine computer illustrations graced the cover of G-men issues #63-124 (from 2001-2006) and set the tone for gay Japanese art in the 21st century. Aside from its iconic covers and culturally significant editorial content, G-men has published thousands of gay manga stories over the years. Many of the artists we love and frequently post about here on the blog developed their careers in the pages of G-men, including Go Fujimoto, TAMA, Noda Gaku, Kumada Poohsuke, Takeshi Matsu, Kazuhide Ichikawa and many more. Here’s an excerpt of what Kaz wrote on his English-language blog today:

I’d been drawing my manga on the magazine for….I think more than 20 years.
The magazine gave me lots of memories.
Through the magazine, I got to know so many people not only within Japan but also from overseas, too.
I think quite big part of my career as a gay manga artist came along with the magazine.
The publishing company published all of my 7 books. Wow.

Gengoroh Tagame had a more complicated relationship with the magazine over time, as he describes in a Facebook post:

I was one of the founders of the magazine, so once the magazine was very special for me. But our relationship already ended in 2006, when I was betrayed and was kicked out. Frankly speaking, now I already don’t have any kind of love with the publisher and the magazine itself (except writers and artists), because of my serious suffered memories on the break-up time.

So I can’t say “Thank you” and I don’t want to say “Good job” to the magazine. I only say “Good-bye”. It’s my second good-bye. But I want to say “Thank you, good job!” to all writers and artists who have ever worked with the magazine. I praise them to the skies. They marked great footsteps on the history of Japanese gay culture, especially on gay art. And I sincerely pray for their good fortune. Even if the magazine is over, the publisher is treacherous and the editor is incompetent, arts never die.

Gay manga will continue to thrive, and despite its at times problematic relationship to the artists, there’s no denying that G-men was an important springboard for the genre’s success. Its loss will be felt. The legacy and impact of this great magazine will reverberate for generations, while gay art continues to evolve and adapt. 

Some sad news: after 21 years and 241 issues, G-men magazine will...



Some sad news: after 21 years and 241 issues, G-men magazine will be ceasing publication. The magazine’s publisher, Furukawa Shobou, will continue producing gay manga for digital distribution via e-books and a forthcoming smartphone app. The company’s DVD and book publishing business will also continue. 

G-men was launched by founding editors Gengoroh Tagame and Hiroshi Hasegawa, along with another editor from Badi magazine, in 1995. The early issues (#1-62) featured cover artwork by Tagame, during which time the artist was intimately involved in many aspects of the magazine’s production. The magazine’s impact in the 1990s cannot be understated: it helped establish a boldly masculine new aesthetic for the Japanese gay community, spoke openly about issues like HIV/AIDS, and had an outlook that was both global and proudly Japanese. 

Jiraiya’s hypermasculine computer illustrations graced the cover of G-men issues #63-124 (from 2001-2006) and set the tone for gay Japanese art in the 21st century. Aside from its iconic covers and culturally significant editorial content, G-men has published thousands of gay manga stories over the years. Many of the artists we love and frequently post about here on the blog developed their careers in the pages of G-men, including Go Fujimoto, TAMA, Noda Gaku, Kumada Poohsuke, Takeshi Matsu, Kazuhide Ichikawa and many more. Here’s an excerpt of what Kaz wrote on his English-language blog today:

I’d been drawing my manga on the magazine for….I think more than 20 years.
The magazine gave me lots of memories.
Through the magazine, I got to know so many people not only within Japan but also from overseas, too.
I think quite big part of my career as a gay manga artist came along with the magazine.
The publishing company published all of my 7 books. Wow.

Gengoroh Tagame had a more complicated relationship with the magazine over time, as he describes in a Facebook post:

I was one of the founders of the magazine, so once the magazine was very special for me. But our relationship already ended in 2006, when I was betrayed and was kicked out. Frankly speaking, now I already don’t have any kind of love with the publisher and the magazine itself (except writers and artists), because of my serious suffered memories on the break-up time.

So I can’t say “Thank you” and I don’t want to say “Good job” to the magazine. I only say “Good-bye”. It’s my second good-bye. But I want to say “Thank you, good job!” to all writers and artists who have ever worked with the magazine. I praise them to the skies. They marked great footsteps on the history of Japanese gay culture, especially on gay art. And I sincerely pray for their good fortune. Even if the magazine is over, the publisher is treacherous and the editor is incompetent, arts never die.

Gay manga will continue to thrive, and despite its at times problematic relationship to the artists, there’s no denying that G-men was an important springboard for the genre’s success. Its loss will be felt. The legacy and impact of this great magazine will reverberate for generations, while gay art continues to evolve and adapt. 

Introducing MASSIVE F/W 2015!We’re thrilled to announce a new...



















Introducing MASSIVE F/W 2015!

We’re thrilled to announce a new fall/winter collection dedicated to our two original artists, JIRAIYA and GENGOROH TAGAME. Featuring collaborations with MISSION CHINESE FOOD and new media artist TERRELL DAVIS. In stores and online November 15th!

Two years ago, MASSIVE GOODS debuted Jiraiya’s BEST COUPLE. The photo-real (hand-drawn, digitally enhanced) image of two men staring adoringly at each other made waves online and has been adored and adorned by queer and heterosexual fans around the world. According to Jiraiya, the soul mates are named Asakichi and Seiji. They live together in a house that would literally fall apart if they were ever to get in a real fight; that is just how strong they are. According to Jiraiya, Seiji would almost pass for straight but Asakichi is “so enormous he’d gross out most women, and attract only the most adventurous men.” They love to take long aimless drives in their beat up Volvo, and have compatible body mass indexes.

The long-awaited return of Jiraiya’s iconic couple comes in two BOLD, enticing colorways—the classic cloudy blue sky and a psychedelic new magic hour sunset hue! We’ve completely reconstructed the garment body and developed the perfect husky fit with upgraded 60/40 poly-blend fabric, luxury trims, and fits up to 3XL.

MISSION CHINESE FOOD teams up with MASSIVE for a second shirt in tandem with the release of their gorgeous cookbook. Jiraiya’s classic Mission Chinese hunk features front and center, visibly reaching his bliss point with a bowl of the restaurant’s legendary mapo tofu. The new shirt features a background that quite literally *reflects* the sensational decor of the New York restaurant.

Gengoroh Tagame fans rejoice! The master is back with a gorgeous contribution to the collection from his new book, THE CONTRACTS OF THE FALL. Tagame’s latest BDSM-themed manga tells the tale of Genryu, a retired pro wrestler blackmailed into sexual submission. The illustration of a collared, restrained Genryu comes with extra detail (read: denser body hair) especially for MASSIVE, in two colorways: pink and light gray. The Contracts of the Fall debuts in November from Bruno Gmunder Verlag.

MASSIVE is proud to launch their first collaboration with TERRELL DAVIS, an innovative new media artist who has made a name for himself designing 3D-modeled album covers, digital collages, and VR worlds like his virtual art exhibition space, Tensquared Gallery. Davis’s T-shirt features a Jiraiya illustration of a beefy priest (originally commissioned by Japanese male escort service G.G. Group) alongside a bevy of 3D objects paying homage to the Hokkaido-based artist. The resulting T-shirt has the atmosphere of a MASSIVE dreamscape.

Our newly redesigned website debuts November 15th, the same day the F/W collection debuts online and at boutiques like Opening Ceremony and the BASE Superstore in Miami!

Introducing MASSIVE F/W 2015!We’re thrilled to announce a new...



















Introducing MASSIVE F/W 2015!

We’re thrilled to announce a new fall/winter collection dedicated to our two original artists, JIRAIYA and GENGOROH TAGAME. Featuring collaborations with MISSION CHINESE FOOD and new media artist TERRELL DAVIS. In stores and online November 15th!

Two years ago, MASSIVE GOODS debuted Jiraiya’s BEST COUPLE. The photo-real (hand-drawn, digitally enhanced) image of two men staring adoringly at each other made waves online and has been adored and adorned by queer and heterosexual fans around the world. According to Jiraiya, the soul mates are named Asakichi and Seiji. They live together in a house that would literally fall apart if they were ever to get in a real fight; that is just how strong they are. According to Jiraiya, Seiji would almost pass for straight but Asakichi is “so enormous he’d gross out most women, and attract only the most adventurous men.” They love to take long aimless drives in their beat up Volvo, and have compatible body mass indexes.

The long-awaited return of Jiraiya’s iconic couple comes in two BOLD, enticing colorways—the classic cloudy blue sky and a psychedelic new magic hour sunset hue! We’ve completely reconstructed the garment body and developed the perfect husky fit with upgraded 60/40 poly-blend fabric, luxury trims, and fits up to 3XL.

MISSION CHINESE FOOD teams up with MASSIVE for a second shirt in tandem with the release of their gorgeous cookbook. Jiraiya’s classic Mission Chinese hunk features front and center, visibly reaching his bliss point with a bowl of the restaurant’s legendary mapo tofu. The new shirt features a background that quite literally *reflects* the sensational decor of the New York restaurant.

Gengoroh Tagame fans rejoice! The master is back with a gorgeous contribution to the collection from his new book, THE CONTRACTS OF THE FALL. Tagame’s latest BDSM-themed manga tells the tale of Genryu, a retired pro wrestler blackmailed into sexual submission. The illustration of a collared, restrained Genryu comes with extra detail (read: denser body hair) especially for MASSIVE, in two colorways: pink and light gray. The Contracts of the Fall debuts in November from Bruno Gmunder Verlag.

MASSIVE is proud to launch their first collaboration with TERRELL DAVIS, an innovative new media artist who has made a name for himself designing 3D-modeled album covers, digital collages, and VR worlds like his virtual art exhibition space, Tensquared Gallery. Davis’s T-shirt features a Jiraiya illustration of a beefy priest (originally commissioned by Japanese male escort service G.G. Group) alongside a bevy of 3D objects paying homage to the Hokkaido-based artist. The resulting T-shirt has the atmosphere of a MASSIVE dreamscape.

Our newly redesigned website debuts November 15th, the same day the F/W collection debuts online and at boutiques like Opening Ceremony and the BASE Superstore in Miami!

I’m stoked to share this video recapping MASSIVE’s recent party...



I’m stoked to share this video recapping MASSIVE’s recent party in Tokyo and providing an introduction to the Massive anthology. Please help us spread the word!

Two years ago, Anne Ishii and I visited Tokyo to meet and interview nine artists on the vanguard of gay manga, including Gengoroh Tagame, Jiraiya, Takeshi Matsu, and Seizoh Ebisubashi. What these masterful artists had to say provided the foundation for the first English-language primer on the subject, Massive: Gay Erotic Manga and the Men Who Make It, published by Fantagraphics Books and designed by the legendary Chip Kidd.

To celebrate the release of Massive, we threw a party at the bar DOOP in Tokyo’s gay district, Shinjuku Ni-chome! Anne hosted a gay manga talk show with Tagame, Ebisubashi, Kumada Poohsuke and Kazuhide Ichikawa, while DJ Mondrian and DJ DSKE provided the beats for gachimuchi go-go boys Chibi Hiro and Don Buri. Backstage, a rare reunion of gay mangaka unfolded in the VIP lounge…