Shirogane no Hana (銀の華) and Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1...















Shirogane no Hana (銀の華) 
and Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1 (日本のゲイ・エロティック・アート)
by Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎)

Signed editions of these rare and beautiful books from Pot Publishing are now available at MASSIVE

Shirogane no Hana (銀の華) and Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1...















Shirogane no Hana (銀の華) 
and Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1 (日本のゲイ・エロティック・アート)
by Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎)

Signed editions of these rare and beautiful books from Pot Publishing are now available at MASSIVE

cruiseorbecruised: Bon Magazine ca. 1973 - 1975by Kuro Haga...



cruiseorbecruised:

Bon Magazine

ca. 1973 - 1975
by Kuro Haga (波賀九郎)

Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎) highlights the aesthetic impact of Kuro Haga’s photo magazine Bon (梵) in the introduction to his non-fiction book Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1:

At the time the time around the birth of gay magazines, some male nude picture books were published, and they too had an important role in the history of gay erotic art in Japan. In particular, the work of two photographers. One is Yato Tamotsu, who is known for his personal connection with Mishima Yukio, has left three picture books, Taido (Body, Marshall Arts) Hadaka-matsuri (Naked Festivals) and OTOKO (Male). The other is Haga Kuro, who published many picture books under the name Bon. These artists are most important and should be highly evaluated for both the quality of their work and the influence they had on gay erotic artists of the same generation. 

cruiseorbecruised: Bon Magazine ca. 1973 - 1975by Kuro Haga...



cruiseorbecruised:

Bon Magazine

ca. 1973 - 1975
by Kuro Haga (波賀九郎)

Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎) highlights the aesthetic impact of Kuro Haga’s photo magazine Bon (梵) in the introduction to his non-fiction book Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1:

At the time the time around the birth of gay magazines, some male nude picture books were published, and they too had an important role in the history of gay erotic art in Japan. In particular, the work of two photographers. One is Yato Tamotsu, who is known for his personal connection with Mishima Yukio, has left three picture books, Taido (Body, Marshall Arts) Hadaka-matsuri (Naked Festivals) and OTOKO (Male). The other is Haga Kuro, who published many picture books under the name Bon. These artists are most important and should be highly evaluated for both the quality of their work and the influence they had on gay erotic artists of the same generation. 

Do you have an idea or can point me towards a good explanation why a lot of gay manga revolves...

Q: Do you have an idea or can point me towards a good explanation why a lot of gay manga revolves around BDSM and torture? I've tried thinking about it critically, but without knowing much history I can't be too insightful.

It’s a great question, and I’m afraid there’s no simple answer! Japan has its own rich indigenous sexual history, following a trajectory almost completely unperturbed by the West up until the Meiji Restoration in 1868. Elements of torture and BDSM have been present in Japanese culture for centuries, long before the Marquis de Sade (1740-1814) came to define the term “sadism.” Rope bondage, for instance, can be traced back to the martial art of Hojojutsu, estimated to be over 1,000 years old. 

In Gay Erotic Art in Japan Vol. 1, Gengoroh Tagame follows the origins of contemporary Japanese gay erotic art to the hentai zasshi (“perverse magazines”) of the post-war era, which allowed all kinds of erotica to co-exist: heterosexual, gay, lesbian, fetish and S&M. These magazines, like Fuzokukitan, were the platform for a generation of gay artists whose work frequently focused on BDSM, including Go Mishima, Tatsuji Okawa, and Sanshi Funayama.

Nowadays, the incidence of BDSM actually seems much lower than it was half a century ago in Japanese gay erotic art. There’s a lot more room for a variety of sexual tastes in contemporary gay manga, so it usually depends on each artist’s personal predilections. Clearly, BDSM is essential to the erotic tastes of Gengoroh Tagame, which accounts for its frequent appearance on this blog— but while BDSM isn’t entirely absent from in the work of mangaka such as Kazuhide Ichikawa and Seizoh Ebisubashi, it’s perhaps less central to their practice.

The erotic themes in gay manga also have a lot to do with which magazine is paying for it. If a mangaka is hired by SM-Z, their work is going to be bondagey. If it’s for Samson, it’s going to feature an older male character. For G-men, the characters might have a more “macho” look. So BDSM is just one “flavor” available in the Japanese gay marketplace, and hence gay manga.