We’re thrilled to announce that “What is Obscenity: The Story of...



We’re thrilled to announce that “What is Obscenity: The Story of a Good For Nothing Artist And Her Pussy” by Rokudenashiko is a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize in the Graphic Novel category!! The winner will be announced on April 21 at USC in Los Angeles, in tandem with the Book Festival.

On May 2, Rokudenashiko will herself be making a much-anticipated appearance at the PEN World Voices Festival in a conversation with sculptor Ali Asgar. 

“Exposure: Gender Sex and Power” is a ticketed event, so book your seat now and stay tuned for MASSIVE promos and fun giveaways planned for Rokudenashiko’s talk!

Our friends at bad-ass DJ collective Discwoman took time out from...













Our friends at bad-ass DJ collective Discwoman took time out from dismantling the patriarchy and revolutionizing dance music to model the new “Free Manko” tee by MASSIVE x Rokudenashiko!

Proceeds from the shirt will go toward Rokudenashiko’s legal and tour fund. Read our interview with Rokudenashiko to find out more about her legal fight and her graphic novel memoir, What is Obscenity? The Story of a Good For Nothing Artist and Her Pussy (forthcoming from Koyama Press). 

We asked the women of Discwoman: What does “Free Manko” mean to you?

Frankie: If manko is free, women are.

Emma: Freeing manko gives agency to a woman. If she is free she can pursue what she dreams of in life.

Christine: Manko is cunt—unapologetic, fierce and unafraid to express freely.

Founded by Frankie Hutchinson, Emma Burgess-Olson and Christine Tran, Discwoman is a New York-based platform, collective, and booking agency—representing and showcasing cis women, trans women and genderqueer talent in electronic music. Started as a two-day festival in September 2014 at Bossa Nova Civic Club Discwoman has since produced and curated events in 15+ cities—working with over 150 DJs and producers to-date. 

Photography by Chris Engdahl. 
Get your “Free Manko” tee at MASSIVE-GOODS.com!

Free Manko tee

Noah Berlatsky wrote an excellent article on Massive for Ravishly...



Noah Berlatsky wrote an excellent article on Massive for Ravishly last month titled “Yowie, ‘Yaoi’! Male Fetishization In American Comics And Manga.” Unfortunately, it seems Kumada Poohsuke’s sense of humor is lost on Berlatsky– but the writer draws insightful comparisons between the exaggerated muscularity of gay manga beefcakes and the ostensibly heterosexual representations of hypermasculinity in superhero comics.

The hotties in Takeshi Matsu’s high school sex goof “Kannai’s Dilemma” share—not so surprisingly when the smoke clears—improbable six packs with Green Lantern. 

Jiraiya’s bulky cavemen look not a little like the Incredible Hulk. 

Citing Eve Sedgwick’s exploration of homosocial desire in Between Men, Berlatsky notes how Jiraiya illuminates the homoerotic undercurrents of the familiar “damsel in distress” trope in Caveman Guu by eschewing the damsel for a romp with his adversaries. “The damsel in distress in adventure fiction really is generally an afterthought; the relationship between hero and villain really is the central point of emotional investment. Jiraiya’s story isn’t so much subverting tropes, as revealing them.”

It makes me happy to see gay manga considered in a critical light. There are hidden depths beneath the sexy surfaces of these comics, ideological critiques embedded within each artist’s gaze. I believe these images have the power to transform the way people see constructs like gender and sexuality, as Berlatsky posits in his conclusion:

[..] Massive does suggest that male erotics, or the fetishization of the male body, is more common than we tend to think. In our culture, it’s women’s bodies that by default are seen as sexualized—tendencies which can lead to a view of women as nothing but fetish objects. Massive serves as a reminder that guys are objects, too, and that the way we see and the stories we tell figure male bodies as sexual, even in a mainstream culture that is reluctant to admit as much. 

To read Massive isn’t to discover a hidden truth, but to see a massive, obvious fact—bulging out for all the world to see.’

Read the whole piece at Ravishly!

On New Year’s Eve, The Hairpin posted “Size Matters,” an...



On New Year’s Eve, The Hairpin posted “Size Matters,” an excellent interview with Anne Ishii conducted by our pal Chris Randle! The thoroughly entertaining and edifying conversation touches on everything from translation to Tenga to gender and the appeal of gay manga to female audiences:

Anne: […] I don’t really have a theory as to why women are attracted to narratives about gay sex, but it is very determined, what straight women go for. Or actually gay women for that matter, many of whom have told me that they are big fans of Tagame’s work, for example, but not necessarily of some of our other artists. Even though a lot of women do like man-on-man sex in comics, it’s not all man-on-man sex comics. So, like, obviously there’s yaoi and BL, which is created almost exclusively by women, but even in the hardcore realm—it’s not necessarily Jiraiya, for example, most of his fans are dudes. Tagame’s big.

Maybe one of many themes that translates to women is—not just the idea of displacing body issues or displacing gender roles, but getting down to that nutty core of desire. I don’t think Tagame’s work is just about men loving men, it’s really about how dark desire can be. And that’s different from the humour of Poohsuke’s work or the absurdity of Ebisubashi’s work or the celebration of male corporeality in Jiraiya’s work. That’s a theme I think women gravitate towards.

Read the whole interview with Anne over at The Hairpin! <3

On New Year’s Eve, The Hairpin posted “Size Matters,” an...



On New Year’s Eve, The Hairpin posted “Size Matters,” an excellent interview with Anne Ishii conducted by our pal Chris Randle! The thoroughly entertaining and edifying conversation touches on everything from translation to Tenga to gender and the appeal of gay manga to female audiences:

Anne: […] I don’t really have a theory as to why women are attracted to narratives about gay sex, but it is very determined, what straight women go for. Or actually gay women for that matter, many of whom have told me that they are big fans of Tagame’s work, for example, but not necessarily of some of our other artists. Even though a lot of women do like man-on-man sex in comics, it’s not all man-on-man sex comics. So, like, obviously there’s yaoi and BL, which is created almost exclusively by women, but even in the hardcore realm—it’s not necessarily Jiraiya, for example, most of his fans are dudes. Tagame’s big.

Maybe one of many themes that translates to women is—not just the idea of displacing body issues or displacing gender roles, but getting down to that nutty core of desire. I don’t think Tagame’s work is just about men loving men, it’s really about how dark desire can be. And that’s different from the humour of Poohsuke’s work or the absurdity of Ebisubashi’s work or the celebration of male corporeality in Jiraiya’s work. That’s a theme I think women gravitate towards.

Read the whole interview with Anne over at The Hairpin! <3