Photographs from the book Naked Festival, 1968by Tamotsu Yato...











Photographs from the book Naked Festival, 1968
by Tamotsu Yato (矢頭保)

Description of Tamotsu Yato's Naked Festival from Richard Hawkins:

The book portrays, as indicated by its title, traditional men’s festivals of Japan. These festivals have a multiplicity of function: harvest blessings, changes of season and rites of passage into manhood, yet all are marked nationwide by several singular characteristics. They are reserved solely for males (women and girls participate in female-only festivals). Social hierarchies of age are averted by all the participants being of a certain age (this may be practical as well, given the mad crush of some of the events, someone too old or too young might simply get hurt). The social hierachy of class and profession are also eliminated by the unifying dynamic of nakedness; all the participants wear fundoshi, traditional Japanese loincloth. And, lastly, the concentration is never individually competitive, i.e. there is no winner per se at the climax of the event; group exertion and endurance may characterize the goal of these activities best.

Obviously, these festivals would be of interest to a young photographer who has already decided to focus exclusively on three of their fundamental characteristics: naked (1) males (2) of a certain age (3).

Photographs from the book Naked Festival, 1968by Tamotsu Yato...











Photographs from the book Naked Festival, 1968
by Tamotsu Yato (矢頭保)

Description of Tamotsu Yato's Naked Festival from Richard Hawkins:

The book portrays, as indicated by its title, traditional men’s festivals of Japan. These festivals have a multiplicity of function: harvest blessings, changes of season and rites of passage into manhood, yet all are marked nationwide by several singular characteristics. They are reserved solely for males (women and girls participate in female-only festivals). Social hierarchies of age are averted by all the participants being of a certain age (this may be practical as well, given the mad crush of some of the events, someone too old or too young might simply get hurt). The social hierachy of class and profession are also eliminated by the unifying dynamic of nakedness; all the participants wear fundoshi, traditional Japanese loincloth. And, lastly, the concentration is never individually competitive, i.e. there is no winner per se at the climax of the event; group exertion and endurance may characterize the goal of these activities best.

Obviously, these festivals would be of interest to a young photographer who has already decided to focus exclusively on three of their fundamental characteristics: naked (1) males (2) of a certain age (3).

Photographs of Yukio Mishima (三島 由紀夫) in his homefrom Ba-ra-kei:...

















Photographs of Yukio Mishima (三島 由紀夫) in his home
from Ba-ra-kei: Ordeal by Roses (薔薇刑), 1961-1962
by Eikoh Hosoe (細江 英公)

Quote from Yukio Mishima’s preface to Ordeal by Roses:

The world to which I was abducted under the spell of [Hosoe’s] lens was abnormal, warped, sarcastic, grotesque, savage, and promiscuous…It was, in a sense, the reverse of the world we live in, where our worship of social appearances and our concern for public morality and hygiene create foul filthy sewers winding beneath the surface. Unlike ours, the world to which I was escorted was a weird, repellent city—naked, comic, wretched, cruel, and overdecorative—yet in its underground channels there flowed, inexhaustibly, a pellucid stream of unsullied feeling.