My Brother’s Husband (弟の夫) news round-up!Loads of exciting...



















My Brother’s Husband (弟の夫) news round-up!

Loads of exciting developments related to Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎)’s gay-themed manga for general audiences: The first collected volume (chapters 1-7) of the series was released in book form at the end of May, and the sales have been gangbusters. The original printing sold out entirely within 3 days of release, and in less than two weeks a third printing has already been confirmed by the publisher. Before selling out, Tagame’s book had reached #32 on Amazon Japan’s manga rankings, a rare feat for a gay manga artist.

An interview with Tagame by ITMedia went viral, and was listed in the top ten most popular articles on Yahoo this week, further boosting awareness of this groundbreaking work. Tagame made an appearance at Animega Shinjuku at the Marui Annex, and signed books for over 100 guests in 2 hours. And the 8th chapter of My Brother’s Husband debuted in Monthly Action magazine, boasting brilliant cover art by Tagame-san!

The demand for an English-language translation of My Brother’s Husband has been incredibly high on social media, and I wish we had had some news to report about its publication. No one wants to see this manga in English more than me and Anne! Publishing is a slow, fickle beast but I trust that it will happen eventually, as this amazing manga has just become a full-blown phenomenon.

New Sanba no Karasu cover and the official English-language...





New Sanba no Karasu cover and the official English-language digital release!

Jiraiya (児雷也)’s third collection of short manga, originally printed in 2009 and then expanded into the Extra Large Portion in 2012, now features a brand new cover illustration of the titular “Three Crows.” The bulky trio of athletes and lovers are Shingo (wrestler), Taisuke (judo) and Giichi (sumo). The new edition of Sanba no Karasu: Extra Large Portion (三羽のカラス 特盛り) debuts on May 22nd, 2015 and is available for pre-order on G-Project or Amazon.co.jp

G-men publisher Furukawa Shobou has also recently begun selling authorized digital versions of gay manga on DLSite, including an English-translated version of Sanba no Karasu! The 342 page collection is split into 10 parts sold for $3.19 (380円) each. The translation is pretty solid and the artwork looks great in this official digital release. 

Support Jiraiya and the producers of Sanba no Karasu and read these classic gay manga in English here:

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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 1)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 2)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 3)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 4)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 5)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 6)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 7)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 8)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 9)


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Sanba no Karasu Extra Large Portion - English Edition (Part 10)

Full translation of the ARTE TV Tracks segment on Gengoroh...



Full translation of the ARTE TV Tracks segment on Gengoroh Tagame, generously submitted by hidingbehindyourstuff. Thank you kindly!!

So your post appeared on my dash and since arte broadcasts both in French and German (meaning I could translate) I thought it would be too bad not to.

http://tracks.arte.tv/fr/gengoroh-tagame-le-roi-du-manga-gay

We stay entertained with our next guest, the master of gay manga.

Hairy men, strongly muscled, gay SM orgy and oversized genitals… here is what the world looks like according to Gengoroh Tagame.

And here is what the man looks like himself, surprised by the rain.

At the age of 50, Gengoroh Tagame is an international reference in a seldom seen artistic domain : the homosexual pornographic manga.

“I always draw situations that touch me emotionally, I also feel a kind of spirituality when I draw a bit like the religious artists of ancient times, to whom art was a tribute to the gods.”

We won’t know what the gods think of Tagame’s drawings - but they did give him his talent.

In Japan he has had for a long time the honors of respectable galleries. After art studies at the very elitist Tama art school in Tokyo, Tagame became artistic director for an advertisement agency. In the 90’s, he abandoned everything in favour of drawing and becomes the icon of the gay manga scene.

“My recipe is extremely simple with time I came to realize that many things that excited me sexually also excited my fans. I just have to draw what I like. It’s the key to success. Up to now, it’s been working.”

In the Japanese gay community, Tagame is a super star ; his works fill the shelves of homo book shops. In the meantime, his art is exposed in the galleries in the US, Germany or France. Up to now, Tagame has published 19 books, part of which is being sold in English and French.

Gay manga have a rich history in Japan ; they are called “bara” mangas. “Bara” means rose and the first Japanese gay magazine was called “Barazoku”. Founded in 1971, it is also the first to publish drawings. At the time they were only being shipped through mail, stealthily packed - one needed a membership to receive them.

“From the start, bara mangas were erotic and especially activist. Through their stories, the authors were trying to publish their own experiences to the next generation. The stories also touched theme like everyday life and the search for social status.”

The gay district of Tokyo in Shinjuku shows that such status is far from being reached. In this area, homosexuals are not discriminated against. But outside, many avoid making a coming out. The typical Japanese doesn’t like to get noticed, which explains the country being relatively late in areas like gay marriage.

“It is not in the Japanese mindset to defend one’s own interest too aggressively. It goes against the ideal of a harmonious society. This thinking isn’t helping with achieving rights of sexual minorities.”

The work of sensitization done by artists like Gengoroh Tagame is then even more important. Even if the master doesn’t feel the same need to create as 20 years ago, he doesn’t imagine a future without drawing.

“I wish to continue what I have started. I have never done anything else since my childhood. I do see that I am ageing, my eyes are not the same, god only knows why.”

“But I wont stop ; I will continue to give the best of myself.”

Full translation of the ARTE TV Tracks segment on Gengoroh...



Full translation of the ARTE TV Tracks segment on Gengoroh Tagame, generously submitted by hidingbehindyourstuff. Thank you kindly!!

So your post appeared on my dash and since arte broadcasts both in French and German (meaning I could translate) I thought it would be too bad not to.

http://tracks.arte.tv/fr/gengoroh-tagame-le-roi-du-manga-gay

We stay entertained with our next guest, the master of gay manga.

Hairy men, strongly muscled, gay SM orgy and oversized genitals… here is what the world looks like according to Gengoroh Tagame.

And here is what the man looks like himself, surprised by the rain.

At the age of 50, Gengoroh Tagame is an international reference in a seldom seen artistic domain : the homosexual pornographic manga.

“I always draw situations that touch me emotionally, I also feel a kind of spirituality when I draw a bit like the religious artists of ancient times, to whom art was a tribute to the gods.”

We won’t know what the gods think of Tagame’s drawings - but they did give him his talent.

In Japan he has had for a long time the honors of respectable galleries. After art studies at the very elitist Tama art school in Tokyo, Tagame became artistic director for an advertisement agency. In the 90’s, he abandoned everything in favour of drawing and becomes the icon of the gay manga scene.

“My recipe is extremely simple with time I came to realize that many things that excited me sexually also excited my fans. I just have to draw what I like. It’s the key to success. Up to now, it’s been working.”

In the Japanese gay community, Tagame is a super star ; his works fill the shelves of homo book shops. In the meantime, his art is exposed in the galleries in the US, Germany or France. Up to now, Tagame has published 19 books, part of which is being sold in English and French.

Gay manga have a rich history in Japan ; they are called “bara” mangas. “Bara” means rose and the first Japanese gay magazine was called “Barazoku”. Founded in 1971, it is also the first to publish drawings. At the time they were only being shipped through mail, stealthily packed - one needed a membership to receive them.

“From the start, bara mangas were erotic and especially activist. Through their stories, the authors were trying to publish their own experiences to the next generation. The stories also touched theme like everyday life and the search for social status.”

The gay district of Tokyo in Shinjuku shows that such status is far from being reached. In this area, homosexuals are not discriminated against. But outside, many avoid making a coming out. The typical Japanese doesn’t like to get noticed, which explains the country being relatively late in areas like gay marriage.

“It is not in the Japanese mindset to defend one’s own interest too aggressively. It goes against the ideal of a harmonious society. This thinking isn’t helping with achieving rights of sexual minorities.”

The work of sensitization done by artists like Gengoroh Tagame is then even more important. Even if the master doesn’t feel the same need to create as 20 years ago, he doesn’t imagine a future without drawing.

“I wish to continue what I have started. I have never done anything else since my childhood. I do see that I am ageing, my eyes are not the same, god only knows why.”

“But I wont stop ; I will continue to give the best of myself.”

The new English-language edition of Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎)’s...



The new English-language edition of Gengoroh Tagame (田亀源五郎)’s manga Fisherman’s Lodge (冬の番家), translated by Anne Ishii, is now available from Bruno Gmünder! The German publishing house has also just printed the third editions of their previous Tagame translations, Gunji and Endless Game. We’ll have all three books in stock at MASSIVE next week!